The shortage of skilled workers in Sweden and hiring alternatives

Following recent reports from the Swedish Employment Agency, it has emerged that Sweden has a worrying lack of a skilled workforce. This is particularly evident in sectors such as engineering and ICT/technology; moreover, the population increase brings about similar shortcomings in the health and education sectors. In such fields, foreign professionals tend not to choose Sweden mainly for the complexity of migration regulations and for the growing housing problem, which understandably worsens the country’s appeal in the eyes of non-Swedish talents.

According to experts, the shortage of supply of workers is only going to worsen in the coming years.

The reasons for the mismatch between the supply of graduates and the demand of the Swedish employers are many, and complex to analyze. The substantial growth of IT and tech companies, for instance, paired with the relatively low number of university graduates in computer sciences in Swedish universities, leads to a shortage of supply of workers which is, according to experts, only going to worsen in the coming years. A similar situation takes place in the case of workers in the education sector, where the current workforce is becoming older, and new regulations make it more difficult for younger Swedes to get a foot in the door.

Companies, for instance, will find it increasingly difficult to grow in a competitive market without the right talent for their operations.

A lack of skilled workers is not just a question of numbers. The consequences of this shortage of skilled labor are indeed far bleaker than it might appear at first. Companies, for instance, will find it increasingly difficult to grow in a competitive market without the right talent for their operations. Even though the Swedish economy is in a generally good condition, this degree of labor market stress is likely to curb growth in the medium term, if strong commitments to find solutions are not made. The obvious answer to this problem would be to hire professionals from abroad. However, strict immigration laws that de facto hinder, or even impede, the entrance and permanence of skilled workers in Sweden, as well as an intricate bureaucracy that makes it harder for employers to take steps in the right direction, frustrate attempts to hire skilled foreign workers.

It is precisely here that AIESEC’s vision comes into play. Despite the alarming situation of the Swedish lack of skilled workers, AIESEC manages to fulfill its promise to connect the world by helping companies overcome many of the problems they face while looking for talents from abroad. Interns coming to Sweden through AIESEC are indeed entitled to a work permit that is considerably easier to obtain. Most importantly, AIESEC promises to take care of all the paperwork and visa applications on behalf of the company – and delivers. The global reach and the wide scope in professional backgrounds available to AIESEC and its customers are further choices to entrust the largest student run organization in the world with the matching between your company and the best possible candidate – wherever they come from.

AIESEC Hire from Abroad Page

 

References:

The Local

Sveriges Radio

Skills Panorama

1 reply
  1. B. Ebai
    B. Ebai says:

    I will be on the job market in 3 months from now and from all indications the outcome does not look promising for. I totally understand the need to have Swedes working at Swedish companies ( I also believe it important to give priorities to Swedish citizens) but when Swedish Biotechnology industry restricts (maybe a strong work) hiring to Swedes rather than foreigners that make me concern about my future If I plan to stay and work in Sweden (Sweden has given me so much in terms of education). When I take a look at the companies am interested via LinkedIn where I can see the list of current employees, the majority are Swedish names. This scares the hell out of me.
    Now, doesn’t that exclude talents? I am not sure what takes precedence having a predominantly Swedish work environment or foreigners who have studied in Sweden get employed?
    This is me just thinking aloud! Maybe I am mistaken, but this is the impression I get even from talking to other foreigners living in Sweden of different ethnicity.

    Reply

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